Finished Quilt

This was my first sampler quilt, first quilt-as-you-go quilt, and my first free-motion-quilting quilt. As always seems to be the case (nothing ever being easy),  – I have learnt a lot.

  • if you quilt as you go, quilt everything before joining, including the borders
  • fabric may be the same ‘type’ but fabrics of different quality will also have different ‘qualities’
  • free-motion quilting requires much practise
  • free-motion quilting has a miraculous effect in ‘pulling it all together’
  • be patient with yourself, your fabric, and your thread which WILL break – several times – and you will – eventually – finish

If not for the quilt-as-you go method, I just would not have had the strength or patience to try dense free-motion quilting.  As it was, my machine did not cooperate and the bobbin tension was uneven.  I must investigate those little teflon discs you can put under the bobbin: see if that helps.   I also had enormous difficulty with the quilting threads not rotating, so that if I forgot for a moment to keep pulling thread out each time I changed my hand position, the thread would snap.  Again and again – Grrrrr.  I used two shades of Cotty Variegated, Caribbean and Bouquet.  It was fine, I love the thread quality,  until I had used up a fair bit and then the reels just would not spin.  Anyone else experienced this?

 Next time, I will quilt the borders as well as the main area before joining them together.  In this case, I quilted the main body in three sections: each section was quilted and then joined, and then I quilted over the join.  I then added carefully measured border pieces unquilted, but I had the devil of a job quilting them.  There was fluting and it was difficult to achieve a useful and lasting grip to achive useful areas of meander.  A rubber glove on my left hand helped, but I will investigate other make-it-easier devices.  T’other thing I learnt was that fabric from Walmart (I was over excited at the thought of supermarkets stocking craft wares  – I have had this fabric since my first trip to the US –  for about eight years!!), is thin and weak!

 The pictures above and below show the quilt before binding. I love the stained glass effect of the sunlight shining through.   Yes !!!! Sun!!!!

I washed it in the hope that one particular area of border might shrink down a little.  It didn’t, so here I let you into a secret – the hidden flaw.

There was one ‘flute’ that I could not, despite much unpicking, distribute evenly.  I had to make a little pleat in the backing border and stitch it neatly down before completing the meander quilting.  I then applied the label – over the pleat.  Tsk tsk……..

The label is made using my beloved Bubble Jet Set 2000 to prepare a piece of the main fabric for printing. 

Then to my favourite bit – the binding – well one of my favourite bits.  I know some quilters hate doing the binding, but it is such a satisfying task – like edging borders in the garden, a real finishing touch.  I love making binding

and I love applying it.  I am especially grateful to Heather Peterson for her excellent and invaluable post on joining bindings – so obvious once you know!!  This part actually went like a breeze and I hand stitched it finished while listening to a good play on Radio 4. 

So it’s finished. 


Ooh my carpet! Bought as a temporary measure from an auction for £40 – that was 20 years ago!!

 

Phew.  If I didn’t have a bathroom to plumb, I just have this little idea  ……………………

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About George

A friendly Sociophobe
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3 Responses to Finished Quilt

  1. angie Cox says:

    Lovely ,so many of the quilts I made in the 1970s and 80s need mending now. They are well worth the effort especially the Liberty print ones.

    Like

  2. Emily says:

    I love quilts hangin in the sunshine. And learning is what life is all about. I think you did a beautiful job.

    Like

  3. I think you should be very proud of yourself!!

    Like

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